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The King Hall Negotiations Team (KHNT) was founded to recognize the utility of alternative dispute resolution skills as they relate to legal practice. KHNT works to educate and train students on the arts of negotiation, mediation, arbitration, and client counseling pertaining to a wide range of situations including contract disputes, public relations management, and family dispute resolution. By regularly hosting speakers and skills training workshops from throughout the legal profession, students, faculty, and guests engage in educational lectures and discussions. Further, organizing biannual intraschool competitions and preparing team members for national competitions provides invaluable practical skills training to current King Hall students. 

HOW TO LEARN ABOUT NEGOTIATIONS
KHNT hosts a number of noontime speakers on the King Hall campus throughout the year as well as various mixers in the Sacramento area. In particular, KHNT hosts speakers during their annual "Shark Week" preceding the Annual 1L Competition each fall. Past speakers have included Andrew Greenwell of "Million Dollar Listing: San Francisco," Suzanne Miller of Global and NA Commercial Sales Legal Group at Hewlett-Packard Company, Eric Kastner of Kastner Kim LLP, Dr. Scott T. McCreary of CONCUR Environmental Conflict Resolution, and Jason Jasmine of Messing Adam & Jasmine LLP, among many other distinguished guests. If you would like to learn more about what the KHNT does and skills we focus on, check out the KHNT blog here

HOW TO PRACTICE NEGOTIATIONS
Students can practice negotiations and other alternative dispute resolution through participation in competitions, coursework, and sparring. 

First year law students and LLMs at King Hall are welcome and encouraged to participate in the Annual 1L Negotiation Competition held every Fall at UC Davis School of Law. In the spring, all current law students and LLMs are encouraged to participate in the Annual Intraschool Negotiations Competition. Participation in each competition includes a mandatory skills training session and a unique fact pattern drafted by our problem writing Chair. More information on both competitions can be found here.  

Coursework specifically related to the goals of KHNT include the following: Advanced Negotiations Strategy & Client Counseling, Alternative Dispute Resolution, International Business Negotiations, International Commercial Arbitration, Mediation, and Negotiations. To see if they are offered a particular semester, please check the registrars site here.

Team members and invited guests "spar" with KHNT Team Members throughout the year to prepare them for national competitions. Competitors practice the set of fact patterns provided by the competition organizers while the sparring partners create unique facts, attempting to predict the opposition's goals and strategies. More information on sparring can be found here

HOW TO JOIN KHNT
Current second and third year King Hall students are eligible to join the King Hall Negotiations Team. Interested students submit applications in the spring and are selected by the sitting Board. Students with exceptional talent and demonstrated interest in alternative dispute resolution are admitted to the program. 

Blog

Thursday Thought: Online or Offline?: Factors of Aggressiveness When Negotiating Online

Posted By Sam Mandell, Jun 16, 2016

          Millennials are constantly being told that they need to put away their electronic devices and interact with the real world. This might be particularly true when millennials, now graduating from law school, enter the legal field and begin negotiating. Researchers have identified dramatic differences between negotiations that take place via email versus one that occur face-to-face. When we head online, our interactions have a risk of suffering from bad symptoms including reduced rapport building, decreased satisfaction with the negotiation, and lower levels of trust. So, when you are considering whether to negotiate in person or online, here are a couple of key questions to keep in mind.

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Thursday Thought: Inter-cultural Negotiations

Posted By Flavio Araujo, May 26, 2016

The power of “you”: An inter-cultural way to improve your negotiations outcome

Inter-culture negotiations get you nowhere!

Many people believe that the above is true. Some scientific studies even throw us in that direction. You know the feeling. Someone from a different country tries to negotiate with you and… Come on! Where did that come from?? Why did he do that? Isn’t that weird?

The power of “you”: An inter-cultural way to improve your negotiations outcome Inter-culture negotiations get you nowhere! Many people believe that the above is true. Some scientific studies even throw us in that direction. You know the feeling. Someone from a different country tries to negotiate with you and… Come on! Where did that come from?? Why did he do that? Isn’t that weird? Well, looks like the common-sense idea above is not true, according to a study published by Mary C. Kern and colleagues. And if you ever negotiated inter- culturally and felt that way, maybe you should reconsider your analysis of what happened. This study points us to another direction, showing that inter-cultural negotiations may produce greater joint gains for the parties involved than intra-cultural negotiations. The use of language as a bridge builder A study made with American and Korean students from Ivy League institutions shows us that the use of the pronoun “you” makes a huge difference in the outcome of negotiations. The researchers put together 92 students (47 U.S. and 45 Korean) and then split them up into three teams of two: 16 U.S. – U.S.; 15 U.S. – Korean; and 15 Korean- Korean. The Koreans were considered bi-cultural because they have “deep experience in two cultures and have acquired the cultural theories or mindset of both cultures”. They were given a negotiation exercise, and their results were measured. The results showed that the U.S.–Korean teams fared better than the others in terms of obtaining joint gains. Evaluating what happened in each team, the researchers found that the inter- cultural teams with American and Korean negotiators used the pronoun “you” more in their negotiation. The pronoun “you” and words related to it (your, yours, you’d and you’ll) were more effective in bridging social distance, the “degree of sympathetic understanding”, between the negotiators when used in phrases related to (i) asking about the other’s preferences and/or priorities (e.g. “when would you like to start?”); (ii) showing insight into the other’s preferences and/or priorities (e.g. “…that also depends on where you live. I mean if you live in San Francisco,…”); and (iii) making an offer (e.g. “what about I give you $10,000?”). [more]